DiCaprio’s *Before the Flood* at DePaul

Monday, November 7th, 2016

6:00 pm – 9:00pm

McGowan South 107

See trailer here



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Filed under Chicago Climate Festival, Climate Change, Film

“These aren’t the droids you’re looking for”


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by | October 20, 2016 · 22:28

Values Project: Anthropogenic Climate Change

William Jordan III: “Therefore the Winds: Climate Change, Values, and Technologies of the Imagination”

  • Wednesday, October 19, 2016
  • 6:30pm 8:30pm
  • DePaul University, Lincoln Park Campus, McGowan South Room 104

“Bill Jordan is widely recognized as an intellectual leader in the field of ecological restoration. In the course of a career spanning 39 years he has played a key role in the shaping of ideas about the value of restoration as a conservation strategy, a technique for basic research, and as a performing art and the basis for a ‘new communion’ with nature.”

“In a rant that anticipates by 400 years our concerns about the prospects of global climate change, Titania, the queen of the fairies in Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” (II,i: 81-117) attributes the disordering of the climate to her husband, who, she asserts, has interfered with the rituals by which the fairies maintain the order of the world.  If we allow that fairies may be taken in this context as “people,” what Shakespeare is depicting here is actually anthropogenic climate change. And the passage reminds us of an ancient wisdom we should perhaps hasten to recover and put into practice at this perilous moment [in the midst] of climate disaster.”
–William Jordan on Environmental Critique


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Timothy Morton: University of Chicago Lecture

Oct 23, 2016, 2PM

Kent Hall, Room 107
1020 E 58th St
[view map]

In Urth, Ben Rivers partially draws on the work of philosopher Timothy Morton, who offers vivid new perspectives 
on ecological thinking, our uncanny interconnectedness with the nonhuman, and the future to come.

In his latest book, Dark Ecology: For a Logic of Future Coexistence (2016), Morton argues that ecological awareness in the present Anthropocene era takes the form of a strange loop or Möbius strip, twisted to have only one side. Deckard travels this oedipal path in Blade Runner (1982) when he learns that he might be the enemy he has been ordered to pursue. Ecological awareness takes this shape because ecological phenomena have a loop form that is also fundamental to the structure of how things are.

The logistics of agricultural society resulted in global warming and hardwired dangerous ideas about life-forms into the human mind. Dark ecology puts us in an uncanny position of radical self-knowledge, illuminating our place in the biosphere and our belonging to a species in a sense that is far less obvious than we like to think. Morton explores the logical foundations of the ecological crisis, which is suffused with the melancholy and negativity of coexistence yet evolving, as we explore its loop form, into something playful, anarchic, and comedic. His work is a skilled fusion of humanities and scientific scholarship, incorporating the theories and findings of philosophy, anthropology, literature, ecology, biology, and physics. Morton hopes to reestablish our ties to nonhuman beings and to help us rediscover the playfulness and joy that can brighten the dark, strange loop we traverse.

This event is presented in partnership with the Arts, Science & Culture Initiative, the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge, and the Open Practice Committee of the Department of Visual Arts, all at the University of Chicago, and the Seminary Co-op Bookstore.

Timothy Morton is Rita Shea Guffey Chair in English at Rice University. His books include Ecology Without Nature (2007); The Ecological Thought (2010); Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology After the End of the World (2013); and Realist Magic: Objects, Ontology, Causality (2013); and he has published more than 150 essays on ecology, philosophy, art, literature, music, architecture, and food. He has collaborated with several artists, including Björk, Olafur Eliasson, and Haim Steinbach, and blogs regularly at ecologywithoutnature.blogspot.com.


Related Exhibition

Ben Rivers

Sep 10–Nov 06, 2016

Source: http://www.renaissancesociety.org/events/1156/timothy-morton/


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Filed under Climate Change, OOO, Tim Morton

Tragically, yet another storm has come

“Eleven years post-Katrina, I can’t help but wonder how many times we will allow these tragedies of human suffering to go on unabated? Inaction is not doing nothing, it is an active choice to do nothing.”
–Judy Natal

Read more here.

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Filed under Climate Change, Refugees

“one of the great, great documenters of our eco age”

Posted by Tim Morton on Ecology Without Nature.

Judy Natal Screening

“Judy is one of the great, great documenters of our eco age. She’s screening some amazing things, which blew my mind when I saw them last year, soon in Chicago.”

This is a rare opportunity to see Natal’s new work—not to be missed!

See event details below and at chicagoclimate.org 

Judy Natal: Another Storm is Coming

  • Tuesday, October 11, 2016
  • 6:30pm – 8:30pm
  • DePaul University, Lincoln Park Campus, McGowan South, 1110 W. Belden Ave., Chicago, IL  60614
  • Room 108
    • Featuring renowned Chicago artist and educator Judy Natal
    • Keynote address and video screening
    • Videos: Breathed on the Waters and Storm Redux

Please re-post our Facebook event page asap please (Christine Skolnik).

It’s not too late!

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Filed under Judy Natal, photography, Tim Morton

Jeff VanderMeer Interview: “The Strangling Fruit”

A chat with Jeff VanderMeer, author of the wonderfully scary Southern Reach trilogy, about ecology, horror, social responsibility, science-fiction, William Gibson, Margaret Atwood, climate change, and much more.

Jeff VanderMeer knows a lot about “weird” fiction—that sub-genre that lives between the surreal, the fantastic, the absurd, between horror and speculative fiction, between Franz Kafka and China Miéville, Angela Carter and Kelly Link, William Gibson and Jorge Luis Borges, H.P. Lovecraft and Shirley Jackson and Thomas Ligotti. With his wife Ann, Jeff edits the Weird Fiction Review, and the two have also curated two anthologies, The Weird and The New Weird. VanderMeer is also a novelist who, in the past two years, has achieved a tremendous success, which catapulted him to one of the most widely-known and interesting names in the world of fiction, globally.

His Southern Reach trilogy—comprised of the novels Annihilation, Authority and Acceptance—was published by FSG over an eight month period in 2014, to national and international acclaim. It was optioned by Paramount Pictures for a series of movies, the first of which will be directed by Alex Garland (Ex-Machina), and was translated and published in 35 countries. Specifically, the three novels could be considered speculative, fantastical eco-horror. They are set in and around Area X, a wild, mysterious, and dangerous patch of land, which lies in an unspecified part of the Southeastern United States, surrounded by a strange border within which there exists a new, unexplainable ecosystem, one where the laws of physics and biology seem to not apply. The first novel, Annihilation, tells the story of the biologist, one of the four women who are sent into Area X as part of the twelfth expedition. The expedition team is made of the biologist, an anthropologist, a psychologist, and a surveyor. All previous expeditions before this one ended very badly. One saw the members kill each other. Another group contracted massively aggressive tumors. Others committed suicide. And how about the Southern Reach, the government agency created to study and control Area X? What secrets does it hide?  [ . . . ]

Read more here.

See my March 2016 post on Southern Reach and Daniel Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year here.

Image source: http://io9.gizmodo.com/read-the-mesmerizing-first-chapter-of-jeff-vandermeers-1520682658




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Filed under Jeff VanderMeer, science fiction, Tim Morton