Category Archives: photography

Lucas Foglia: Human Nature. Jul 19 — Sep 30, 2018


Lucas Foglia, Esme Swimming, Parkroyal on Pickering, Singapore

Human Nature examines our relationship to the natural world and the human desire for “wild” places—even when those places are human constructions. Lucas Foglia’s lyrical, formally considered photographs challenge the concept that humans and nature operate in opposition, while highlighting the relentlessly uneasy, sometimes absurdly comedic juxtapositions of human technologies and nature.

From literal urban jungles to so-called untarnished wilderness, from the scientific realities of climate change to the poetic human longing for time outdoors, Human Nature is a nuanced exploration of the forces—internal and external—that both pit us against and bring us closer to the natural world.

The MoCP is supported by Columbia College Chicago, the MoCP Advisory Board, the Museum Council, individuals, and private and corporate foundations. The 2017-2018 exhibition season is generously sponsored by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Efroymson Family Fund, and the Illinois Arts Council Agency.

Lucas Foglia, Kenzie inside a Melting Glacier, Juneau Icefield Research Program, Alaska

Lucas Foglia, Kate in an EEG Study of Cognition in the Wild, Strayer Lab, University of Utah, Utah

Lucas Foglia, Troy Holding a Guinea Fowl Chick, GreenHouse Program, Rikers Island Jail Complex, New York

 

Lucas Foglia: Human Nature will be available as a traveling exhibition. Please direct exhibition booking inquiries to Karen Irvine kirvine@colum.edu.

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Filed under aesthetics, Nature, photography, Uncategorized

Create/Engage, Inspire/Provoke, Think/Change

 

 

The DePaul University Institute for Nature and Culture is excited to invite you to a panel discussion with four activists/artists/ecologists who are engaged in crucial struggles for our planetary future and provide models of hope in these arduous times.

Tuesday May 15th 2018, 7 – 9 pm
DePaul University, McGowan South,
1110 W Belden Ave, Chicago, IL 60614 (Room TBA)

 

Taylor Brorby is an essayist, poet, and memoirist whose work centers on hydraulic fracking and climate change in western North Dakota.

Lucas Foglia’s photographs challenge the concept that humans and nature operate in opposition, while simultaneously highlighting the relentlessly uneasy, absurdly comedic integrations of our technologies in the natural world.*

Shannon Heffernan is a reporter with WBEZ. She has covered environmental news and criminal justice issues. She also reports on poverty, labor, and climate change.

Nat Mengist cultivates equitable, land-conscious partnerships through training in garden education, nonprofit leadership, and post-humanities scholarship.

Sponsored by the DePaul Institute for Nature and Culture.

Contact: rhonold@depaul.edu

*Foglia’s third book, Human Nature, was just published by Nazraeli Press. His next solo exhibition opens July 19 at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago. (Images beneath title by Lucas Foglia.)

 

 

 

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by | May 3, 2018 · 14:07

Entangled

By Joshua Mason at Fieldwork Studios and Not So Solid Earth

 

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Filed under Animals, Art, Jeff VanderMeer, photography

Humans of Kiribati

hungry tide

THE HUNGRY TIDE

Photographer’s Caption: In this picture, we see the impact of Cyclone Pam’s initial waves on the Capital Island of Tarawa. Sandbag walls, constructed from reused rice bags and gathered sand are often the island’s only defense against king tides, storms, and cyclones. “To be honest I thought this is the end of my world. It’s like watching a live movie. People running for their lives, BUT praise the Lord it’s just a mini tsunami. Heaps of things destroyed, fortunately no one is harmed. Now, people are beginning to wonder how long they will be able to remain in their homeland.”

See more here.

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Filed under Climate Change, photography

Toxic Waste

 

Judy-Natal_work-2

 

beneath the myth

of separation

from nature

separation from

culture lies

we posit

normative perspectives

and dream

of high ground

but there is no

rarified

 

culture

inhabits us

all

contaminated

 

it is toxic waste you mourn for

 

Photograph by Judy Natal: Source Flats Studio

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Art, photography, poetry

Bad Victories.

Bad Victories

Source: Bad Victories.

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Filed under Art, photography

What is the Lay of the Land: Part II

by Joshua Mason

Editor’s Note:  This essay is based on Mason’s presentation at DePaul University last October. See Part I here.

To ask ‘What is the lay of the land?’ is to ask what the land looks at when it sees itself.

Joshua Mason_Mirrorworks B.jpg

I’ve continued to photograph mirrors in the landscape. Of course the mirror has become a symbol retaining a long history and meaning, from reflection and perception to a stage in the formation of subjects, etc.. Is it a symbol of our seizure by desire, a beautiful hallucination, or is it the artist’s embraced place allowing for artistic liberty? Is it a way of looking at the world implying a psychological opening? All works of art are quotations of moments of the reflectivity as visual proof of one’s existence—it is ‘here I am’ for a time—but art is a terrain truly of that which is not me. As an artist I am not reflected in the mirror.[1] The mirror is also an abyss, shedding our interpretation for an unaccountable infinity. The other of us that it reflects is the stranger of the mirror itself.

Joshua Mason_Mirrorworks

Critchley, paraphrasing Socrates, says that to do philosophy is “to learn how to die.” I think something similar ought to be said about doing art, which is after all a form of philosophy. We are all subject to finitude. I think every artist who is sensitive to their craft knows this on an intuitive level: they feel it in the materials, at the edge of the catastrophic. As an artist I am conditioned by my own extinction.

Certain abstractionists wanted surfaces to be smooth, streamlined, hygienic—a sterilized picture plane, an insinuation of reduction of nature, complexity and chance. But time asserts itself upon sleek surfaces. Malevich, for example, who wanted to break from the earth and in whose discourse the earth takes on negative valences.[2] The Black Square, nevertheless, as one of the pivotal works of twentieth century art has cracks upon the painted surface. It is the revenge of the geomorphic quality of painting.[3]

The Extinctions series is a recent set of photographs. I am using a black square placed into the landscape. It cuts into the landscape like a black hole. It places a bomb in between images and the associations attached to them.[4]

Black Square.2

Escaping from words and into being, to be silent in the face of a work of art is to practice that silence elsewhere in the face of other objects. That being is catastrophic, poised always at the edge. It is subject to materialization and decomposition, sedimentation and erosion—to becoming. From confrontation with the edge, I look at nature in wonderment and trepidation. I am interested in geomorphic tendencies to mineralize the imagination. I am caught up in excitation and intensity. I am interested in speculating on my own disappearance in the midst of nature. To stretch out beyond oneself in a condition of difference, to that which loses the intellect. When this occurs the initial question—what is the lay of the land?—disappears.

All photographs by the author.
________________________________________________________________________

[1] The mirror, traditionally associated with identity, is placed into the natural environment: the forest, the field, the shoreline. I am not reflected in the mirror because it is important that in the face of nature I attempt to displace identity. The beholder also sees the photograph of nature that includes the mirror but the mirror does not reflect the beholder: instead what appears in the mirror is the forest, the field, the shoreline—the land looking at itself, captured in a moment.

[2] See Malevich to Mikhail Matyushin, June 1916, cited in Zhadova, Malevich, 124, n 39. The symbol even of the negation is itself subject to nature’s ubiquity: entropy, erosion, sedimentation, disposition, weathering, time—becoming.

[3] Geologic catastrophism covers over the culture of painting like a landslide.

[4] A dream of escaping from words into being. Leaving the realm of conventions behind—historic, linguistic —in order to attain immediacy, moving signification out of the realm of the discursive where the object’s meaning would be the essence itself. To the challenge of the crisis of the sign, via signing and naming nature, via the image and its association, the black square is an extinction.

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Filed under Art, ecologies, Objects, photography